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Preparedness and response to chemical and biological threats: the role of exposure science.

Paul J. Lioy, Ph.D. - 15 min 19 sec ago

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Preparedness and response to chemical and biological threats: the role of exposure science.

Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2016 Aug;1378(1):108-117

Authors: Lioy PJ, Laskin JD, Georgopoulos PG

Abstract
There are multiple components to emergency preparedness and the response to chemical and biological threat agents. The 5Rs framework (rescue, reentry, recovery, restoration, and rehabitation) outlines opportunities to apply exposure science in emergency events. Exposure science provides guidance and refined tools for characterizing, assessing, and reducing risks from catastrophic events, such as the release of hazardous airborne chemicals or biological agents. Important challenges to be met include deployment of assets, including medications, before and after an emergency response situation. Assessment of past studies demonstrates the value of integrating exposure science methods into risk analysis and the management of catastrophic events.

PMID: 27479653 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Publications from UCDPER Members

Macrophages and inflammatory mediators in pulmonary injury induced by mustard vesicants.

Jeffrey D. Laskin, Ph.D. - 15 min 20 sec ago

Related Articles

Macrophages and inflammatory mediators in pulmonary injury induced by mustard vesicants.

Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2016 Jun;1374(1):168-75

Authors: Malaviya R, Sunil VR, Venosa A, Vayas KN, Businaro R, Heck DE, Laskin JD, Laskin DL

Abstract
Sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM) are cytotoxic alkylating agents that cause severe and progressive injury to the respiratory tract, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Evidence suggests that macrophages and the inflammatory mediators they release play roles in both acute and long-term pulmonary injuries caused by mustards. In this article, we review the pathogenic effects of SM and NM on the respiratory tract and potential inflammatory mechanisms contributing to this activity.

PMID: 27351588 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Publications from UCDPER Members